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20130211
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
in congress, bringing his mandate down to size. democrats try to do the same thing to richard nixon in '73, even before watergate. chris: you think it's a normal pattern? everyone agree we're watching normal intransigence? i'm watching them fight this hagel nomination so far successfully. they don't seem like they're in awe of the president at all. >> no, but i think it's weakened a little bit. the unanimousty of republicans weakened. we saw republicans break off agree on the fiscal cliff deal. we saw breakoff on the sandy aid and starting to see some break off on immigration. it's certainly true they continue to be very hard on the president but not quite as hard as they were much of the first term. >> we know historically, the second -- chris: you know being in the cook report that's the hardest job in the world, get re-elect your party -- >> re-elected. if you then are showing all of your time as opposition party to soften up democrats, not about the president now, it's about the party and taking control of the senate. chris: let's take in the most vivid example this week, hagel, secret
to richard nixon. and richard nixon vetoed it even though it passed with lots of republican votes. president nixon said the idea of preschool for everyone had quote, family-weakening implications. he said quote, the child development envisioned in this legislation would be truly a long leap into the dark for the united states government and the american people. a long leap into the dark. 40 years after president nixon said no to preschool for all american kids with the weird leaping in the dark analogy, president obama is trying to bring a version of that idea back with a plan for early education for all americans. but this time the president has wind in his sails blowing in from an unlikely source. it's blowing in from a really, really red state. from maybe the reddest of all red states. this is how oklahoma voted in 2012. mitt romney swept every county. in 2008 john mccain swept every county. in 2004 george bush swept every county. oklahoma is the reddest place we've got in america. and republicans, you may have heard, like to think that they do not think much of the policy ideas of barack
it training, i particularly liked the gun -- at the end. but there wasn't come in richard nixon's turn, the lift of a driving dream. >> colby? >> i don't think it was supposed to be the kind of address. i think he laid out an agenda he wants to pursue. i think he will achieve some of it. it will happen with immigration reform, i believe it, maybe not to the extent he wants. i think he will get something on guns. there is a movement out there and he hit it just right, the tone on it. minimum wage will be the traditional fight, but i think he was right to lay down the agenda that he wants to he will have to pursue it with the democrats because he will get very little support from republicans. >> nina, put your schoolmarm face on. on a grade of a to f, what would you give the speech? >> b+. there was a certain laundry list element to the speech, which it there is with every state of the union. in the end, it ended on a high note and a passionate note on bonds, and there was an overall tone, which was center-left but reasonable, and he did not come off looking as silly and sort of way over
was suburbanites turned on the democrats and we got richard nixon. we can prematurely declare these things sometimes. a cautionary note. >> goldie, the piece says today's gop is taking its cues from john calhoun and his belief in nullification. the idea that states can ignore federal law. he writes it's not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first african-american president is in office. how du the gop reach out to a broader demographic when we see how it's treated this nation's first black president? >> that is the grand irony but the truth of the matter is they're not only hearkening back to calhoun, but they're playing the script of kevin phillips who was the chief architect of the southern strategy. this was the chaining together of those southern confederate states, those 11 states, with what was happening out west and up through the midwest, and he said at the time we can frankly do without manhattan. we can do without new york. we can do without chicago. we can do without all these major city that is were largely black and brown. the republican
in the early 1970s, richard nixon said privately if it were up to him i would outlaw, he said, every pistol in the country. he was strongly for gun control, though he didn't do much about that in public. >> michael beschloss, it's always great to have your perspective. >> thank you. >> call it a marsupial flash mob. the first round of play at the women's australian open was interrupted incredibly thursday by a herd -- is that the correct term -- a herd of galloping kangaroos. they didn't tear up the green, we're told. [ woman ] we had two tiny reasons to get our adt security system. and one really big reason -- the house next door. our neighbor's house was broken into. luckily, her family wasn't there, but what if this happened here? what if our girls were home? and since we can't monitor everything 24/7, we got someone who could. adt. [ male announcer ] while some companies are new to home security, adt has been helping to save lives for over 135 years. we have more monitoring centers, more of tomorrow's technology right here today, and more value. 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, a
with former presidents richard nixon. general ford and that means all government offices and post offices and things are closed. they will be on saturday's schedules. and ac transit will be on a sunday schedule. >> cal train is on a modified schedule. they will be enforced. >>> well, happening now. we want to update you on an accident in san francisco. >> now the car went off the road near the 280 connector. it is about 90 minutes ago. the driver ran from the scene. they believe he is in a caltrans lot. it is unclear why the driver fled. >> rosemary is is keeping a eye on the forecast for us on this sunday. now the sun is up. hour and a half. >> we don't see the sun. >> but, it is improving. >> we still have another pleasant day in store. >> not as warm as thursday. friday. or yesterday. but still feeling good by the afternoon. live look over the bay. >> few fingers of fog and low patches and fog around the bay area. >> sort of hit or miss. >> some areas are waking up with blue skew skies. >> if you are in petaluma, patchy dense fog and all the way to the ground. tough visibility for you
, whether it was jerry ford, whether it was richard nixon, whether it was jimmy carter with the rescue mission, failed rescue mission of the diplomats in tehran or ronald reagan with grenada. never has a president just said, thanks very much. let me know later what happens. ding. puts the phone down. martha: panetta suggested that was not the way he was. that the president was very much wanted to know what was going on. when he asked did he call you back? did he get it touch with you, the answer to that was no. we also know we had forces in italy were told, actually, don't take off just yet. you need to change out of uniform if you're going to be involved in this in any way. in the end they were not involved in any way. so it goes to the bigger question again why? why would the president not want to step in and help these people? >> what i heard they didn't want a black hawk down incident. any use of american forces before an american election. they could have a situation where there were even more american casualties, american hostage, something would have happened. i think the other
the education, i like the training, i particularly like the gun -- at the end. richarde wasn't come in nixon's turn, the lift of a driving dream. >> colby? >> i don't think it was supposed to be that kind of address. i think he laid out an agenda, and agenda he wants to pursue. i think he will achieve some of it. something will happen with immigration reform, i believe. i think he will get something on guns. there is a movement and he hit it just right with the tone. minimum wage will be the traditional fight. he was right to lay out the agenda he wants. he will get very little support from republicans. >> nina, on a scale from a to f, how would you rate the speech? >> b +. although there was a surgeon laundry-list element to the speech, which there is to every state of the union, in the end it ended on a high note and passionate note about guns, and there was an overall tone which was center-left but reasonable. he did not come off looking silly and sort of way over the top. it was a far more restrained speech and then you would think he would get from a "liberal liberal." >> charle centss
hero, eisenhower, the soldier of democracy. and the purely pragmatic political guy, richard nixon, who was essentially forced on eisenhower's ticket by party regulars. and eisenhower was wary of nixon, but also realized he had great political strengths. nixon knew or learned eventually that eisenhower was actually an extraordinary political leader. each learned something from the other. and nixon never quite got out from eisenhower's shadow. there's a great moment in the 1968 republican convention when nixon, at last, you know, is going to be -- now, he'd run in 1960 and lost. here's his chance to win. and what does he say? let's win it for ike. can't get away from ike. >> how about what ike said about nixon in '68, when they asked him about, name one important decision that dick nixon had any input in, and he said, i'll have to get back to you. >> exactly! >> give me a week. >> that was actually 1960, when nixon had been vice president. >> '60, yeah. >> yeah, joe writes, ike and dick is a highly engrossing political narrative that skillfully takes the reader through the twisted develo
timothy naftali.he was the director of the richard nixon potential library and museum from 2007 until 2011. >> when you did the 149, peoplee who serve in the nixon administration, how did you raise the money to do that? andhey had buyer's remorse a group of alumni of the nixon administration who worked on the domestic side rallied and raise a lot of money for this program. i received contributions from donald rumsfeld. i believe dick cheney. i think paul o'neill provided some funding. member people. the fault of the domestic side of the head ministration hasn't received the b.j. of the administration hasn't received -- the domestic side of the administration has not received that much attention. for the watergate interviews, i used the trust fund. i was very conservative about the way i used the money. the library received one head- one half of all of the ticket money that came into the library card -- one half of the ticket money that came into the library. that money was our trust fund. i used the money for public programming because the nixon foundation shut down all funding. normally,
richard nixon in the 1970's, overwhelming support by the senate and died on the president's death. this isn't the first time that the president is thinking of some sort of bold plan in his second term to try to do this, but it's at a heavy, heavy cost and the benefit is the question. we have a 48-year-old experiment that may it will us something about whether or not this will work, it's called head start. we've spent untold billions on head start since the johnson administration received more publicity, good publicity than any other federal program and the results are in. no long-term benefit to head start. now, why is that? i'm not against head start on principle. why hasn't it worked? shouldn't we figure it out before we mandate for everyone. >> you're talking the health and human services, while it helps them become more, kindergarten through third grade shows no benefit. as opposed to the control group and for what the president is proposing, 98 billion dollars over ten years, again, i think that people might be willing to pay that if it showed what the president was promising
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)